Event news: Jambinai Re:Connection Tour

by Events Editor on 17 April, 2017

in Event Notices, Experimental & Avant-garde music, Fusion music, Jambinai, VoDs

It’s good to have Jambinai back in the UK for a tour. Their gigs are always a highlight in the calendar. Text below is from Bristol’s Colston Hall website.

Jambinai Re:Connection Tour

Sun 23 Apr 2017, 7pm: Bristol | The Lantern | Colston Hall | Book tickets
Tue 25 Apr 2017, 7pm: Glasgow | O2 ABC Glasgow | Book tickets
Wed 26 Apr 2017, 7pm: London | O2 Academy Islington | Book tickets

Jambinai

The Seoul quintet blends Korean traditional music with noise, experimental rock, metal and hardcore. Jambinai are known for mixing post-rock with Korean folk music using both traditional rock instruments (drums, bass guitar, electric guitar) and traditional Korean instruments (haegeum, piri, geomungo).

Creating some of the most innovative sounds in East Asia’s underground scene, Jambinai are an award-winning post-rock/world music hybrid act that was formed in Seoul, South Korea in 2009 by guitarist and piri (oboe) player Ilwoo Lee, haegum (a fiddle-like instrument) player Bomi Kim, and geomungo (zither) player Eun Young Sim.

Music this rousing and beautiful, rising and subsiding in epic fashion, will doubtless trigger a flood of images, might recall an abyss, or the apocalypse, but Jambinai also represent a positive force, resisting the old ways and reinventing the future. Come join their thrilling adventure.

Jambinai sound less like a band than a force of nature, fusing the full dramatic range of post-rock dynamics to Korean folk roots to create an exhilarating, vivid and unique fusion. Their instrumental music is coloured by Kim’s fiddle-like haegum, Ilwoo Lee’s guitar and piri (a Korean flute made of bamboo) and Eun Youg Sim’s geomungo, a Korean zither.

They met studying traditional music at Korea’s National University of Arts, and found they were united by a desire to present such music in a new way, “to communicate with the ordinary person who doesn’t listen to Korean traditional music,” says Lee, the band’s principal writer. This makeover, however, eschews previous Korean modernists, who Lee says have used western classical music or jazz, for a molten fusion of metal, rock and experimental sound. “We’re darker than other Korean traditional bands,” Lee adds, with considerable understatement.

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