Confucius in East Asia

From the publisher’s website: Richey has written an engaging and well-crafted book that clearly delineates the oftentimes fitful development of Confucianism in China, Japan, Korea, and Vietnam. At the same time, he masterfully demonstrates how Confucianism slowly came to dominate politics, thought, and society in each of these places and still continues to inform their […]

Women and Confucianism in Choson Korea: New Perspectives

From the publisher’s website: A new, multifaceted look at Korean women during a period of strong Confucian ideology. This volume offers a fresh, multifaceted exploration of women and Confucianism in mid- to late-Choson Korea (mid-sixteenth to early twentieth century). Using primary sources and perspectives from social history, intellectual history, literature, and political thought, contributors challenge […]

The Dynamics of Confucianism and Modernization in Korean History

From the publisher’s website: This volume makes available for the first time in English a collection of the work of historian Yi Tae-Jin. Over the course of his career, he has done path-breaking research that covers virtually the entire Chosōn period (1392–1910) from the Koryō-Chosōn transition to the Kojong period and Korea’s takeover by Japan […]

Religions of Korea in Practice

From the publisher’s website: Korea has one of the most diverse religious cultures in the world today, with a range and breadth of religious practice virtually unrivaled by any other country. This volume in the Princeton Readings in Religions series is the first anthology in any language, including Korean, to bring together a comprehensive set […]

Alfred North Whitehead and Yi Yulgok: Toward a Process-Confucian Spirituality in Korea

From the publisher’s website: This book explores the Confucian-Christian dialogue in Korea through a comparative study of the cosmologies of Alfred North Whitehead (1861-1947), the founder of process philosophy, and Yi Yulgok (1536-1584), the great scholar of Korean Neo-Confucianism. Although their philosophical traditions are different, Yulgok and Whitehead’s perspectives on the universe were very similar. […]

A Topography of Confucian Discourse: Politico-philosophical Reflections on Confucian Discourse since Modernity

From the publisher’s website: Throughout history, numerous scholars and intellectuals have tried to define Confucianism one way or another. Despite their efforts, the voices of those who claim to have found the essence of Confucianism are as much at odds as ever. A Topography of Confucian Discourse analyzes Confucian discussion in diverse historical settings, examining […]

The Land of Scholars: Two Thousand Years of Korean Confucianism

This book discusses the historical development of Korean Confucianism in terms of its social functions. It also examines the types of transfiguration Confucianism underwent and the role it played in each period of Korean history. The Land of Scholars spans from the Three Kingdoms period in 18 BC to the Joseon dynasty in 1910. The […]

East and West: Fusion of Horizons

In East and West: Fusion of Horizons, Kwang-Sae Lee seeks to find and develop themes of mutual resonance in Eastern and Western thoughts, trying to interpret across boundaries of culture and age. The book discusses some general “methodological problems” pertaining to the “Meeting of East and West,” Confucianism and Kantian moral philosophy, Heidegger, Wittgenstein and […]

Toegye and Gobong Write Letters

From the publisher’s website: Toegye and Gobong Write Letters is a unique look into the lives of two prominent Confucius scholars. This special edition of their letters highlights their personal struggles as civil servants and scholars. Set in the backdrop of the Four Seven debate, the greatest philosophical debate in Korean neo-Confucianism, these poignant letters have […]

Everlasting Empire

From the publisher’s website: Everlasting Empire (영원한 제국) is a Korean historical novel written as a murder mystery. The narrator frames the main story with his “discovery” of a 150-year-old manuscript. Because of problems verifying the authenticity of the manuscript, the narrator offers the book not as genuine history but as a story. This compelling […]

The Confucian Kingship in Korea: Yongjo and the Politics of Sagacity

From the publisher’s website: The Neo-Confucian kingship was based on the ideal of the sage king, an ordinary human being rendered supreme through his extraordinary virtue. The eighteenth-century Korean ruler Yôngjo, one of that country’s most illustrious yet most tragic rulers, is a fascinating example of the Neo-Confucian sage kingship. In this book, JaHyun Kim […]

Culture and the State in Late Chosŏn Korea

From the publisher’s website: Investigating the late sixteenth through the nineteenth century, this work looks at the shifting boundaries between the Chosŏn state and the adherents of Confucianism, Buddhism, Christianity, and popular religions. Seeking to define the meaning and constitutive elements of the hegemonic group and a particular marginalized community in this Confucian state, the […]

Confucianism and the Family

From the publisher’s website: An interdisciplinary exploration of the Confucian family in East Asia which includes historical, psychocultural, and gender studies perspectives. The family is central to societies that have been profoundly influenced by the Confucian, and later Neo-Confucian, mandate. This book examines the nature of family continuities and the internal family social and psychological […]

Chong Yagyong: Korea’s Challenge to Orthodox Neo-Confucianism

From the publisher’s website: Describes the historical background and philosophy of the reform-minded, eighteenth-century Korean thinker, Chong Yagyong. During the last decade, Chong Yagyong, also known as Tasan, the eighteenth-century Korean thinker who dared attack the hallowed orthodoxy of his dynasty, has become a household name in Korea. In this study, the first ever in […]

Confucian Statecraft and Korean Institutions: Yu Hyongwon and the Late Choson Dynasty

From the publisher’s website: Seventeenth-century Korea was a country in crisis—successive invasions by Hideyoshi and the Manchus had rocked the Choson dynasty (1392-1910), which already was weakened by maladministration, internecine bureaucratic factionalism, unfair taxation, concentration of wealth, military problems, and other ills. Yu Hyongwon (1622–1673, pen name, Pan’gye), a recluse scholar, responded to this time […]

The Korean Neo-Confucianism of Yi T’Oegye and Yi Yulgok: A Reappraisal of the “Four-Seven Thesis” and Its Practical Implications For Self-Cultivation

From the publisher’s website: This comparative study of Yi T’oegye (1501-1570) and Yi Yulgok (1536-1584), Korea’s two most eminent Neo-Confucian thinkers, is a seminal work on the Four-Seven Debate, the most significant and controversial intellectual event in the Korean Confucian tradition. The Four-Seven thesis, a magnificent example of East Asian Confucian discourse at its best, […]