London Korean Links

Covering things Korean in London and beyond since 2006

Chong Yagyong: Korea’s Challenge to Orthodox Neo-Confucianism

From the publisher’s website: Describes the historical background and philosophy of the reform-minded, eighteenth-century Korean thinker, Chong Yagyong. During the last decade, Chong Yagyong, also known as Tasan, the eighteenth-century Korean thinker who dared attack the hallowed orthodoxy of his dynasty, has become a household name in Korea. In this study, the first ever in … [Read More]

Confucian Statecraft and Korean Institutions: Yu Hyongwon and the Late Choson Dynasty

From the publisher’s website: Seventeenth-century Korea was a country in crisis—successive invasions by Hideyoshi and the Manchus had rocked the Choson dynasty (1392-1910), which already was weakened by maladministration, internecine bureaucratic factionalism, unfair taxation, concentration of wealth, military problems, and other ills. Yu Hyongwon (1622–1673, pen name, Pan’gye), a recluse scholar, responded to this time … [Read More]

The Korean Neo-Confucianism of Yi T’Oegye and Yi Yulgok: A Reappraisal of the “Four-Seven Thesis” and Its Practical Implications For Self-Cultivation

From the publisher’s website: This comparative study of Yi T’oegye (1501-1570) and Yi Yulgok (1536-1584), Korea’s two most eminent Neo-Confucian thinkers, is a seminal work on the Four-Seven Debate, the most significant and controversial intellectual event in the Korean Confucian tradition. The Four-Seven thesis, a magnificent example of East Asian Confucian discourse at its best, … [Read More]

The Four-Seven Debate: An Annotated Translation of the Most Famous Controversy in Korean Neo-Confucian Thought

From the publisher’s website: This book is an annotated translation, with introduction and commentary, of the correspondence between Yi Hwang (T’oegye, 1500-1570) and Ki Taesung (Kobong, 1527-1572) and between Yi I (Yulgok, 1536-1584) and Song Hon (Ugye, 1535-1598), known as the Four-Seven Debate, the most famous philosophical controversy in Korean Neo-Confucian thought. The most complex … [Read More]

The Confucian Transformation of Korea: A Study of Society and Ideology

From the publisher’s website: Legislation to change Korean society along Confucian lines began at the founding of the Chosŏn dynasty in 1392 and had apparently achieved its purpose by the mid seventeenth century. Until this important new study, however, the nature of Koryŏ society, the stresses induced by the new legislation, and society’s resistance to … [Read More]

Korea – a religious history

From the publisher’s website: This is an historical survey of all the religious traditions of Korea in relation to the socio-cultural trends of seven different periods of Korean history. The book includes a discussion of the history of the study of religion in Korea, a chronological description of Korean folk religion including shamanism, Buddhism, Confucianism, … [Read More]

To Become a Sage: The Ten Diagrams on Sage Learning

From the publisher’s website: Yi Hwang (1501-1570), better known by his pen name T’oegye, is generally considered Korea’s preeminent Neo-Confucian scholar. The Ten Diagrams on Sage Learning is his final masterpiece, a distillation of the learning and practice of a lifetime, and one of the most important works of Korean Neo-Confucianism. In it he crystallized the essence … [Read More]

Korean Women: View from the Inner Room

From the preface: This collection of articles presents an amazing variety of female roles and certainly belies the stereotype of the powerless and dependent Korean woman. Korean women, whether ideologically confined to the inner rooms or cast out to the periphery of society, created for themselves positions of influence radiating across the narrow ideological and … [Read More]