Hyun Jeung: Underneath the Gam Tree, at MokSpace

News of the latest exhibition at MokSpace.

As Goodwill Ambassador for Sancheong County in Gyeongsangnamdo, home of Korea’s finest persimmons (gam), I’ll certainly be checking this one out.

Hyun Jeung: Underneath the Gam tree

Private View: 29 June 2012, 5 – 8 pm
Exhibition Dates: 29 June – 16 July 2012 / Opening Hours : 11am – 6pm, Every day

Underneath the Gam Tree

Mokspace is delighted to present Hyun Jeung’s first exhibition in London. She is a Korean printmaker and ceramist. Hyun will show her latest woodcuts, created in Paris and Tunis where she lives and works.

“Like many Koreans, we used to have a large Gam tree – or Kaki tree – in our backyard. In the summer, its generous leafage would bring freshness to the house, playing with the wind to paint symphonies of shade and light on the grass. And in the winter, the plump gam fruits would scatter orange dots against the snowy sky.”

For Hyun, printmaking is an art of process rather than a reproduction technique. Paradoxically, it can reveal the changing nature of things through repetition. For example, each time the matrix meets the paper, time and space open for imperfectly dried layers of ink to mix, for the image to interact and play with the veins of the wood.

Hyun’s art hinges on keeping open times and spaces alive to allow the unknown to join with the known. She gives way to a force that can express itself only when the artist steps back: the void. As a result, though each of Hyun’s prints are born from same matrix, lines, and gestures, each of them breathes with undulating colours, textures and moods. Just like the quiet mingling of shade and light underneath the Gam tree.

Hyun Jeung is a printmaker and ceramist. She grew up in Korea before coming to France to earn a PhD in Fine Arts at Université Pantheon-Sorbonne. She also studied at the Beaux-Arts de Paris, with Jean-Pierre Pincemin, and explored Chinese woodblock printing at the Beijing Fine Arts University.

She shows her work in France, Korea and Tunisia, where she lives. Several of her prints were acquired by the Bibliothèque Nationale de France, and the Tunisian Ministry of Culture. She was shortlisted for the GRAV’X prize in 1995 and 2007, and won the first prize of the Salon des Artistes de la Ville de Paris in 2002.

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(automatically generated) Read LKL’s review of this event here.

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