Muse London: media art focus at the KCC

The group exhibition by Korean artists who have made their home in the UK has just finished; now its time for the annual exhibition of selected students and recent graduates:

MUSE LONDON

Participating artists:
Eemyun KANG, Seokyeong KANG, EE, Wonwoo LEE, Sean ROH and Kiwoun SHIN

From 16 December 2011 to 21 January 2012 the exhibition MUSE LONDON brings a showcase of Contemporary Media Art to the KCC.

Muse London poster

The exhibition dwells more specifically on the artists’ interior world as seen through the lens of a foreign world city. The artworks give highly personal reports of the ‘London experience’ told through interviews, documentary snippets, exotic fantasy, paranoia and studied reflections.

The exhibition has been guest curated by Jeremy AKERMAN and managed Ji Hye HONG (KCC UK).

The participating artists for the exhibition ‘MUSE LONDON: THE 4th UK KOREAN ARTISTS EXHIBITION’ are, in alphabetical order:

EE is currently studying MA Fine Art at Chelsea College of Art and Design. video clip presents a unique persona of this husband-and-wife duo. With the element of kitsch and pop culture of its shiny and amusing surface, EE delivers the explosion and clash in its own way of irony and humour.

Still from work by EE

Eemyun KANG completed Postgraduate Diploma in Fine Art at the Royal Academy of Arts, London. She launched the interviews with artists to share diverse idea and approaches on the idea of Mystic Island in London. The video clip brings a poetic rhythm made by layers of interview. This intriguing corresponding is later developed to various forms of art. Her canvasses capture the imaged landscape that continues endlessly.

Still from work by Eemyun Kang

Seokyeong KANG is currently undertaking an MA in Painting at the Royal College of Art in London. By reshoot in the space of KCC, the mirror-like simulacrum leads the audience to come across with the ethereal traces of memory. Her formal interest in emptiness, blank space and emotional movement is coupled with an intuitive understanding of leftovers such as leathers, threads and fabric.

Still from work by Seokyeong Kang

Wonwoo LEE is currently studying an MA in Sculpture at the Royal College of Art, London. His practice is concerned with spatial interventions, transforming objects and phenomenon which is related in physical and social realm. He focuses on making actual happenings that can change the given situations turned into imaginary and uncanny situations. A drummer’s room is stemmed from the personal experience of spatial change by occupation of sound.

Still from work by Wonwoo Lee

Sean ROH is studying an MFA in Media at Slade School of Fine Art, University College London. With his witty manipulation of ordinary objects that found in everyday life, he makes a stage of storytelling. Based on his series of photographs, the ordinary life and episodes in London is told in first point of view. Every scene speaks volume for itself.

Still from work by Sean Roh

Kiwoun SHIN completed MFA Fine Art at Goldsmiths College in 2010. The visual analysis of the existence expands the his experiments from grinding to evaporating. Missing time never exist and News becomes entertainment is a record while a cup of wine was evaporated. While he tries to emphasise and make the scenes more dramatic and theatrical with music, Kiwoun explores the political layer and visual icons of media and eventually questions the visual reality.

Stills from work by Kiwoun Shin

Guest Curator: Jeremy AKERMAN

Jeremy is an artist and editor of artists’ writing. He is an independent curator with a deep enthusiasm for Korean art in particular. MUSE LONDON is Jeremy’s second Exhibition at the KCC with the emerging young Korean artists.

6 thoughts on “Muse London: media art focus at the KCC

  1. I’m super curious to see what exactly EE are exhibiting. Perhaps time has finally come to get tickets for that London weekend I’ve planned for the last few years….

  2. I saw the exhibition today. The photographs and films seemed quite interesting. However, if there had been a title and text to the displays and works (a la Seurat/Turner etc) I would have been able to interpret the message/meanings in a relevant context and understand what the artists were saying better. The practice of the National Gallery is good in this respect.

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