2019 LSE SU EAST ASIA Forum: “New Chapter for Cooperation?”

This year the LSE’s North Korea conference, which for the past couple of years has followed closely on the heels of the Korea Future Forum, has expended its scope to cover the whole region:

2019 LSE SU EAST ASIA Forum: “New Chapter for Cooperation?”

Saturday 23 March 2019, 9:30am – 6pm
Old Theatre | LSE
Tickets: £15.00 (Student Early) | £35.00 (Prof/Non-Stu Early) | Buy ticketsLSE East Asia Forum poster

The East Asia Forum is a collaborative academic conference between LSE SU China Development Society, Korea Future Forum, and Japan society which aims to promote and deliver in-depth current economic and socio-political discussion regarding East Asia. Considering the influences that Korea, China, and Japan have on the East Asian sphere, the mentioned three societies are cooperating together to provide more broad and diverse perspectives. It is the first time to hold the student-led East Asia Forum in LSE to explore an overview of the East Asian countries.

2018 was the year of changes in East Asia, and can 2019 be the year for cooperation and integration?

We are living in an era of non-cooperation and uncertainty – Brexit, US’ withdrawal from the TPP, US-China trade war, South Korea and North Korea are far yet to have actual progression, and continuous historical disputes between neighbouring countries still exist. It is the time where cooperation between countries is desperately needed.

Could cooperation in East Asia, the region which consists of more than 20% of the world’s economy and population, be the new driver of the world economy? How could we cooperate to solve and improve the current societal issues? What are the factors that are hindering possible partnership and how can we overcome?

Concerned about the current economic, political and societal issues in East Asia, LSE SU Korea Future Forum, China Development Society and Japan Society have come together to co-organise the 2019 LSE SU East Asia Forum with the support of LSE Institute of Global Affairs. The forum will comprehensively discuss the new challenges that East Asia is facing and how East Asian countries will potentially cooperate together in order to tackle the challenges.

Many preeminent speakers including the inaugural General Counsel of AIIB, former Country Programme Manager for the UN Women China, Associate Professor of History and International Affairs at the George Washington University, Head of the Department “Sustainable Economic and Social Development” at the German Development Institute, and Co-Head of Asia Center at The Institute for International Political Studies will attend the forum to discuss about the most important current affairs in East Asia.

The five topics that we will cover include:

– ECONOMY: “East Asia with AIIB and BRI: Opportunities or Risks?”
The Economy panel will explore East Asia’s stake in AIIB and BRI, and their anticipated impact in global economy and politics.

– NORTH KOREA: “Causes and Impacts of North Korea’s changed stance”
The North Korea panel will consider how North Korea’s changed political stance towards international community affects relations with China, Japan and South Korea, and how East Asian community will be able to work together with North Korea to settle peace and promote prosperity.

– HISTORY: “The Contested History: The Uncertain Path to Reconciliation”
The History panel will discuss politicised historical issues – including territorial controversies, comfort women issue and Japanese militarism – hindering possible cooperation between the East Asian countries, analysing the role of history education in China, Japan and South Korea to possibly address the historical issues.

– ENVIRONMENT: “Climate Change in East Asia: Impacts and Policies”
The Environment keynote speech concerns about climate change and suggests economic and political actions potentially to be taken by East Asian countries to resolve environmental problems.

– GENDER: “#Metoo Movement in East Asia”
The Gender keynote speech will evaluate the #Metoo Movement in China, Japan and South Korea in socioeconomic and cultural perspectives.

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