Exhibition news: Lee Kang-hyo at Sylvester Fine Art

Lee Kang-hyo came to London in 2014 as part of the special exhibition hosted by the Korea Craft and Design Foundation at Tent London. This event was followed later that year by a solo show at Goldmark Gallery in Uppingham. Lee now has another solo exhibition, at Sylvester Fine Art in Belsize Village, in collaboration with Goldmark.

Lee Kang-hyo

Sylvester Fine Art | 64 Belsize Lane | London NW3 5BJ | www.sylvesterfineart.co.uk
Wed – Fri: 11.00am to 6.30pm | Sat: 10.00am to 6.00pm | Sun: 10.00am to 4.00pm
From 11 May for four weeks

Lee Kang-hyo exhibition

Lee Kang-hyo was born in Seoul in South Korea and is world famous for mastering the traditional Korean technique called Onggi – a technique that allows him to make enormous, often man-sized pots.

Lee is a spiritual man who has undertaken a lifelong search for what he terms ‘a beautiful life’ and it is through his work with clay and the love of his family that he is achieving that ambition. Lee’s work has always been a personal favourite of ours and as far as we can discover, his work has not been available to buy in London before. You can view some of his exceptional work in world class museum collections all over the world and now you have a chance to own your Lee Kang-hyo pot.

Lee Kang-hyo – Biography

Born in 1961, Lee Kang-hyo studied a Bachelor of Fine Arts at Hongik University, graduating in 1983. He then worked for three years as an apprentice in Onggi pottery in the South Kyongsang Province. After training in the technique and a further three years working as an assistant, Lee started his own studio where he developed his pottery with his wife, also a ceramicist, building the kiln they still use to this day.

Lee is widely regarded as one of the finest Korean potters working today and his pots tell the story of a man’s search for a beautiful life, through his work with clay and the love of his family. Set against the backdrop of his South Korean studio, his pots give an insight into the spiritual journey that Lee took and which plays a vital part in his artistic practice today.

Lee is world-famous for mastering the traditional Korean technique called Onggi – a technique that allows him to make enormous, often man-sized pots which he then decorates using an exciting explosion of glaze and colour in his own inimitable fashion.

Lee has exhibited all over the world and his work is held in many important public and private collections including V&A Museum, British Museum, London, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Art Institute of Chicago and International Ceramic Museum, Italy.

Lee Kang-hyo – Artist Statement

The work of an artist reflects his or her life. The temperament of a person is influenced by one’s natural environment. When traveling around the country, mountains are like screen folds enabling one to marvel and be awestruck by the essence of nature. The everlasting theme in my work is based on mountains, fields and sky. Everything that exists has its own reason and beauty. Making something with clay with the hands and then painting white over the surface is an expression of my dream. I am alive at this minute.

Finding life’s meaning is too vast and confusing. It is a struggle and a conflict to find the inner self. Life is not that exceptional nor does it contain a great meaning, yet mere existence itself is precious and beautiful. Making art is like setting off to travel to find peace in the mind. On the throwing wheel, a concentric circle is made then numerous different circular shapes are created. Through this clay a space and a mass is created. This space contains my life. It is I.

There is joy in taking a deep breath and viewing mountains; life is definitely worthwhile just for the fact that I am able to see and exist. Furthermore, I make things that can be looked at and enjoyed. My work is an expression of everything that exists. It is my life itself.

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